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The Roman Baths, Bath

The Roman Baths, Bath

The Roman Baths, Bath

Roman baths are well-preserved thermos in Bath, Somerset, England. A temple was built between 60-70AD in the first few decades of Roman Britain. Its presence led to the development of small Roman urban settlements known as Aqua Sulis around the site. Roman baths - designed for public baths - were used in Britain until the end of Roman rule in the 5th century. According to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, the original Roman baths were destroyed a century later. The area around the natural springs was redeveloped several times during the early and late Middle Ages.

"The Roman Baths, Bath."

Roman baths are preserved in four main features: the Holy Spring, the Roman Temple, the Roman Bath House, and a museum that contains relics of the Aqua Sulis. However, all street-level buildings date from the 19th century. It is a major tourist attraction in the UK and attracts over 1.3 million visitors annually, including the Grand Pump Room. Visitors can visit the baths and museums but not enter the water.

The Roman Baths, Bath

The amount of water

Bath was blamed for the hot springs in the 1591 Royal Charter issued by Elizabeth I. This responsibility has now shifted to Bath and North East Somerset Council, which monitors pressure, temperature and flow rates. Thermal water contains high concentrations of sodium, calcium, chloride and sulfate ions.

"The Roman Baths, Bath."

Roman baths are no longer used for bathing. In October 1978, a young girl swimming in a Roman bath recovered with bath dolphins from a local swimming club contracted meningitis and died, [6] she stopped bathing for several years. Tests have shown a deadly bacterium called Naegleria fouleri in the water. The nearby newly built Therma Bath Spa, and the refurbished Cross Bath, allow modern-day bathers to experience the water through a series of recently drilled boreholes.

"The Roman Baths, Bath."

History of the Roman Baths

The name Sulis continued to be used after the Roman invasion, giving the city the Roman name Aqua Sulis ("Water of Sulis"). The temple was built in 60-70 AD and the bathing complex was gradually built over the next 300 years. During the Roman occupation of Britain, and probably under the direction of Emperor Claudius, engineers drove oak piles to provide a stable foundation in the mud and surrounded the spring with an irregular stone chamber lined with lead. In the 2nd century, it was enclosed in a wooden barrel-vaulted building and included the Caldarium (hot bath), Tepidarium (warm bath), and Frigidarium (cold bath). After the Romans withdrew from Britain in the first decade of the 5th century, they fell into disrepair and were eventually lost to silt and floods. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle suggests that the original Roman baths were destroyed in the 6th century.

The Roman Baths, Bath

Museum

The museum contains Roman artifacts, including objects that were thrown in the holy spring, probably as gifts to the goddess. This includes more than 12,000 denarii coins, the largest collective vote deposit known in Britain. The goddess Sulis Minerva depicts a gilt bronze head, discovered around 1727.

"The Roman Baths, Bath."

The Bath Roman temple stood on a platform more than two meters above the surrounding courtyard, which was reached by a step-by-step flight. Above the approach were four large, fluted Corinthian columns that supported a fridge and furnished pediment above. The pediment, the parts of which are on display in the museum, is a triangular ornamental part, 26 feet (7.9 m) wide and 8 feet (2.4 m) below the top, the building above the front pillar is 15 m (49 ft) above all those approaching the temple. A possible "gorgon" from the height is shown in the strong central figure of the head.

"The Roman Baths, Bath."

Save:

In the late 19th century the Roman emperors and governors of Roman Britain overlooked the Great Baths on the carved roofs, especially sensitive to the effects of acid rain and were protected by washing the cover of a sacrificial shelter every few years. The exhibits in the vicinity of the temple were sensitive to the warm air which had the effect of drawing corrosive salt from Roman stonework. To help reduce this, a new ventilation system was installed in 2006.

"The Roman Baths, Bath."

In 2009, Bath and North East Somerset Council received a 90,000 grant to contribute to the cost of display redevelopment and access to Roman baths, and the Department of Culture, Media and Sports / Wolfson Fund was established to improve museums and galleries in England. Subsequent grants were funded by the London-based specialist organization, Event Communications for further work on the design and layout of the exhibition.

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